Maltesers and Chinese New Year | Toronto Teacher Mom

Maltesers and Chinese New Year

Thursday, February 03, 2011


Did you know that Mars Canada Inc., the makers of Maltesers®, have always celebrated their association with the Chinese New Year? Some believe that it is because of the bright read packaging since red symbolizes good fortune and joy (think Feng Shui). Others believe that the malted milk flavour is enjoyed in the Chinese culture. The Maltesers® brand has been celebrating Chinese New Year with Canadians and chocolate-lovers around the world since 1936. That's 75 years of tasty malted goodness!
These chocolate-coated, honeycombed malt biscuit balls are crunchy, yummy and fun. They make a great treat at a get-together. Or you can find them in a small pack which will fit nicely into your purse. And they are so light, they actually float on water! I was sent some packages to sample and thought they were too good to devour all on my own. So I decided to share them with my staff members. By the end of lunch hour, the large bowl had been emptied!

Maltesers and Chinese New Year

Maltesers are available in 37g (SRP $1.49); 100g (SRP $3.59) and 165g (SRP $4.79) sizes at most major retailers across Canada, including grocery and convenience stores.

Here's some information about Chinese New Year:

The origin of the Chinese New Year Calendar is deeply rooted in age old traditions, dating from 2600BC when the Emperor Huang Ti introduced the first cycle of the zodiac.


Chinese New Year, Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays. Falling on Thursday February 3, 2011, it is often inaccurately called "Lunar New Year", because—as part of the lunisolar Chinese calendar—the date is partially determined based on lunar phase. The festival traditionally begins on the first day of the first month (Chinese: 正月; pinyin: zhēng yuè) in the Chinese calendar and ends with Lantern Festival, which is on the 15th day. The Chinese New Year festivities conclude February 18th, 2011.


People who celebrate Chinese New Year often say "Kung Hei Fat Choy" which means having a great fortune, or "Kung Hall Sun Hei", which implies Happy New Year!


Married couples give red envelopes with money to their kids or relatives of their younger generations instead of giving presents. This money is suppose to bring them great luck and prosperity in the year to come.

To all of my readers, I wish you a wonderful Chinese New Year. Kung Hei Fat Choy!

Disclosure: I was sent some Maltesers samples for the purpose of this review.

You Might Also Like

7 COMMENTS

  1. Much more efficient that way. :-) I thought yours was a giveaway too. Alas t'was not to be. Seems I need to go buy my own now.
    ps: I found your site becasue I was reading responses on practicalmum.com and noticed you commented on the bon jovi tickets. Ahh small world. I love it. www.chriscummins.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Much more efficient that way. :-) I thought yours was a giveaway too. Alas t'was not to be. Seems I need to go buy my own now.
    ps: I found your site becasue I was reading responses on practicalmum.com and noticed you commented on the bon jovi tickets. Ahh small world. I love it. www.chriscummins.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. They would have made for a tasty giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Seems those Maltesers have made the rounds! ;)
    CRUNCH!

    (I'm a cruncher- not a melt-in-your-mouth type, lol!)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Seems those Maltesers have made the rounds! ;)
    CRUNCH!

    (I'm a cruncher- not a melt-in-your-mouth type, lol!)

    ReplyDelete
  6. darn! thought it was a giveaway! lol :-) I love maltesers!

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment here on Toronto Teacher Mom. Hope you have a great day!

Follow on Google+

Follow on Facebook

StatCounter